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August 2016

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Tuesday, April 26th, 2016 09:09 am
(Crossposted from LiveJournal)

How could I have missed these last Friday? The LiveJournal version of the Friday Five *also* posted Shakespeare questions!

Here are my answers.

1) What was the first Shakespeare play you read or saw performed?
I am not going the count the Gilligan's Island musical version of Hamlet, nor The Flintstones' "Romeo-Rock and Juliet-Stone," which means the honors go to ... Romeo and Juliet, which I read in ninth-grade English class in 1975. The version we studied from was bowdlerized, but at the end of the unit the whole ninth grade took a field trip to a local cinema to see a special showing of the 1968 Zeffirelli movie version, which was not (bowdlerized).

2) What is your favorite Shakespeare play?
Henry IV, Part I, I think. But I like Julius Caesar, too, and I am currently still very enamored of A Midsummer Night's Dream, which I saw for the first time last summer in a film version (of Julie Taymor's stage production) that readers may recall I went pretty gaga for.

3) What is your least favorite Shakespeare play?
Still haven't read/seen them all, and in particular haven't gotten around to the odd, outlier ones that it's okay to dislike. ;-) Seriously, I don't dislike any of the ones I've read or seen, but I will say that Twelfth Night is often spoiled for me when they get to the "tormenting Malvolio" part. It's almost always over the top.

4) Who do you think wrote Shakespeare; are you a Stratfordian or Oxfordian?
Stratfordian all the way.

5) Which Shakespeare plays have you read or seen or seen performed?
It's a woefully partial and "usual-suspects-y" collection. Ready?

Histories: Henry IV, Part I (both read & seen) and Henry V (seen).

Comedies: The Tempest (read), Much Ado About Nothing (seen), Love's Labour's Lost (seen), A Midsummer Night's Dream (read & seen), Twelfth Night (seen), The Taming of the Shrew (read), The Merchant of Venice (read). I've not read or seen The Merry Wives of Windsor itself, but I've seen the opera Falstaff -- half a point?

Tragedies: Romeo and Juliet (read & seen), Julius Caesar (read & seen), Macbeth (read), Hamlet (read & seen), Othello (read; saw the Verdi opera). And (why am I not more embarrassed to admit this?) half of King Lear (read).

It is a motley collection (would have been less so if I hadn't been closed out of the Shakespeare class at Loyola College every semester I tried to take it!), but at least it means I still have some to look forward to.

The ones I am planning to get to by the end of 2016 are Titus Andronicus and Measure for Measure. Maybe I could also finish Lear? :-)
 
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